The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories: (Penguin Orange Collection)

The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories: (Penguin Orange Collection)

H. P. Lovecraft, S. T. Joshi

Language: English

Pages: 368

ISBN: 0143129457

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Part of the Penguin Orange Collection, a limited-run series of twelve influential and beloved American classics in a bold series design offering a modern take on the iconic Penguin paperback
 
For the seventieth anniversary of Penguin Classics, the Penguin Orange Collection celebrates the heritage of Penguin’s iconic book design with twelve influential American literary classics representing the breadth and diversity of the Penguin Classics library. These collectible editions are dressed in the iconic orange and white tri-band cover design, first created in 1935, while french flaps, high-quality paper, and striking cover illustrations provide the cutting-edge design treatment that is the signature of Penguin Classics Deluxe Editions today.

The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories
 
Frequently imitated and widely influential, Howard Phillips Lovecraft reinvented the horror genre in the twentieth century, discarding ghosts and witches and instead envisioning mankind as a tiny outpost of dwindling sanity in a chaotic and malevolent universe. This definitive collection reveals the development of Lovecraft’s mesmerizing narrative style and establishes him as a canonical—and visionary—American writer.

Four New Messages

Living by the Word: Essays

Dark City

Look at the Harlequins! (Vintage)

Louisa May Alcott: A Personal Biography

Invisible Criticism: Ralph Ellison and the American Canon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

me that the safest thing was to find out as much as possible before arousing anybody. Regaining the hall, I silently closed and latched the living-room door after me; thereby lessening the chances of awaking Noyes. I now cautiously entered the dark study, where I expected to find Akeley, whether asleep or awake, in the great corner chair which was evidently his favourite resting-place. As I advanced, the beams of my flashlight caught the great centre-table, revealing one of the hellish cylinders

vanish on the black moor surrounding the house. Then, in an exaltation of supreme horror, everyone saw the end. A spark appeared on the moor, a flame arose, and a pillar of human fire reached to the heavens. The house of Jermyn no longer existed. The reason why Arthur Jermyn’s charred fragments were not collected and buried lies in what was found afterward, principally the thing in the box. The stuffed goddess was a nauseous sight, withered and eaten away, but it was clearly a mummified white

unconscious of his fame as he struggled to keep from collapsing with physical fatigue and nervous exhaustion. West could not withhold admiration for the fortitude of his foe, but because of this was even more determined to prove to him the truth of his amazing doctrines. Taking advantage of the disorganisation of both college work and municipal health regulations, he managed to get a recently deceased body smuggled into the university dissecting-room one night, and in my presence injected a new

pointed to the unbroken plaster wall and laughed. So I told them no more. They imply that I am a madman or a murderer—probably I am mad. But I might not be mad if those accursed tomb-legions had not been so silent. The Hound In my tortured ears there sounds unceasingly a nightmare whirring and flapping, and a faint, distant baying as of some gigantic hound.1 It is not dream—it is not, I fear, even madness—for too much has already happened to give me these merciful doubts. St. John2 is a

be fully within the field of science fiction aside from its manifest intent to incite fear. It is significant that Lovecraft’s most “cosmic” stories—“The Colour Out of Space,” At the Mountains of Madness, and “The Shadow Out of Time”—appeared in the science fiction magazines Amazing Stories and Astounding Stories. One facet of Lovecraft’s work that has exercised many readers’ imaginations is what has come to be called the “Cthulhu Mythos.” This term was not coined by Lovecraft, but rather by

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